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11th-Mar-2008 01:24 pm - 10,000 B.C. review
Hapsupshet
John Hawks has a very entertaining review of the imdb forum comments on the new film 10,000 B.C. today.

Unfortunately, it does little of my opinion of the state of education in anthropology today.

"...rest assured that a wide array of well-meaning alumni of undergraduate science courses are ahead of you, brimming with variably-accurate news about radiocarbon chronologies."
Beer
By JUSTIN POPE, AP Education Writer

College students are getting a raw deal, a recent New York report asserted. The problem is they're taking too many classes from part-time, or adjunct, professors.

But that same report unwittingly revealed something about how higher education is more culpable than it likes to admit when it comes to creating the problem.

The issue is a huge one in higher education far beyond New York, with about half of the nation's college faculty now on part-time contracts. Adjuncts are cheaper for colleges, but they often lack the time and resources for focused teaching, and research shows students' performance suffers if they are taught by part-timers too often.

In its report last month, a 30-member commission called for New York's state (SUNY) and city (CUNY) systems to alleviate the over reliance on adjuncts by hiring 2,000 more full-time faculty for their 87 campuses.

But just one page away, the report also called for adding at least 4,000 new doctoral students.

There's a connection between those numbers that deserves more attention.

In many fields, there are already too many Ph.Ds awarded for the full-time academic posts available, creating a surplus of likely jobseekers. That pool becomes adjuncts, who command wages and benefits so low that universities find them irresistible hires.

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25th-Feb-2007 04:43 pm - A survey for those who are interested
sand castle
Hello all,

I am currently writing a paper on the civil war and how the education system teaches it with a different slant in various parts of the US. This focuses mostly on elementary school level, but I understand that very little of that can be remembered. This is more about asking what kind of perceptions did you develop about the war, particularly the representation of the South.

The comments will be screened.

Please help me out. I need people from all over the US.

First off
I hope you don"t feel spammedCollapse )

Thank you so much!

This will probably be xposted, I just don't know where yet.
Two reasons why anthropologists are 'better' than psychologists:

1. Anthropologists drink more and break fewer glasses than psychologists. (From a remark made by a bartender -- working at a venue that  hosted the APA conference a week before the AAAs -- to a AAA presenter.)

2. American Anthropologists Stand Up Against Torture and the Occupation of Iraq: "The AAA's statement stands in stark contrast with the American Psychological Association's ambivalent policies which provides psychologists working in military and intelligence settings with some cover should they wish to assist in extreme interrogations or torture. One of the concerns underlying this resolution comes from reports by Seymour Hersh that CIA interrogators consulted anthropological works such as Raphael Patai's book, The Arab Mind, to better design culture-specific means of torture and interrogation. This resolution passed unanimously with little debate." (From the online magazine CounterPunch)

31st-Oct-2006 10:14 am - Swahili web game to tackle Aids
The United Nations children's agency (Unicef) has launched the first computer game in Kiswahili, aimed at halting the spread of HIV and Aids.

The game called "What would you do?" (Ungefanyaje?) takes players through various scenarios to explain the importance of prevention and testing.

The UN estimates that around 80% of all young people do not know how to protect themselves from Aids.

Africa accounts for most of the world's 2.3m children who are HIV-positive.

More than 100 million people speak Swahili across east African countries such as Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

In the Unicef game, players choose from different options as two male and two female characters embark on relationships.

19th-Sep-2006 12:44 pm - Women graduates challenge Iran
Beer
By Frances Harrison BBC News, Tehran

The number of women graduating from Iran's universities is overtaking the number of men, promising a change in the job market and, with it, profound social change.

Twenty postgraduate students are sitting in a plush modern classroom listening to a lecture on environmental management at the Islamic Azad University - a private institution with 1.6 million students across Iran.

The room is darkened so the students can watch the lecturer's slide show comparing energy consumption around the world.

Three quarters of the students in this class are women - the five men in the class are huddled together in a corner.

Original article with photos or Read more...Collapse )
14th-Jun-2006 06:53 pm - Humpty Dumpty ruled 'too Western'
It's goodbye to Baa Baa Black Sheep and Humpty Dumpty for children in primary schools in a central Indian state.

The Madhya Pradesh government has banned the teaching of English nursery rhymes in primary schools to "reduce Western influence" on children.

Indian rhymes will now replace their popular English counterparts.

"There is no need for English rhymes when there are Indian rhymes to infuse patriotism in children," says state education minister Narrotam Mishra.

He has asked government primary schools from now on to teach Indian rhymes and tales from the life of Ahilya Bai, the legendary ruler credited with building a number of leading temples in India.

9th-May-2006 06:58 pm(no subject)
Delirium
Can anyone explain the 'exact' difference between an Anthropology degree and(/or) a Sociology, History, Biology or Archeaology degree? Not that I'm comparing Archeaology and History degrees, but I'm trying to compare them with Anthro and my knowledge is pretty general.

Also, is anyone familiar with Ontario universities and can recommend one Anthropology program over the other? I'm thinking about getting an undergrad degree in Anthropology and maybe going into Medicine.

Any answers, or even some idea of a better place to ask the question, is appreciated.
10th-Apr-2006 02:13 pm - Living with race hate in Russia
babetista
By Patrick Jackson, BBC News website, Moscow

Juldas Okie Etoumbi, a postgraduate international relations student at Moscow's RUDN university, remembers well his first encounter with a Russian.

Standing in a Moscow Metro carriage for the first time, the young Gabonese man was thrown forward when the train started with a jolt and he grabbed a pole to keep his balance, brushing the Russian man's hand.

Without a word, the Russian withdrew his hand, produced a handkerchief and proceeded to wipe it demonstratively in front of the other passengers.

Christian, a former electrical engineering student from Cameroon now working in Moscow, was recently assaulted by a group of about 10 teenagers on a Metro train in the city centre.

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babetista
Narapatipara High Madrassa in the eastern Indian state of West Bengal is a double storied brick building with a large playground.

It is surrounded by paddy fields and hectares of green farmland.

Its 320 pupils, many of them tribal children and first generation learners, come from the surrounding, largely poor, district of Nadia.

The girls outnumber boys and they are taught together in classrooms with their rickety wooden tables and benches.

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Pickwick
(Note: I'm posting this because the group tends to be interested in the interaction between church and state. Maybe not explicitly anythopological in nature, but theorhetically just about all human action falls within the sphere, I think.)

House OK's Bible study in public high schools

The Associated Press - ATLANTA

A bill that allows public high schools to offer classes on the Bible sped through the House Monday, passing overwhelmingly with no debate.
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10th-Mar-2006 10:48 pm(no subject)
I already have my opinion but I would like some outside opinions. I will be graduating next year with a B.A. in Psychology and a B.A. in Anthropology. Not a double major, but two seperate bachelor's degrees. I will have completed both degrees in the time it takes to complete one (hopefully :) ). I will most likely be applying to graduate school for anthropology. Do you guys think that me having two degrees instead of one will boost my competitiveness at all or does it all still just boil down to grades and scores?
Thanks!
- Bruce
27th-Jan-2006 09:42 pm - Britons unconvinced on evolution
babetista
Just under half of Britons accept the theory of evolution as the best description for the development of life, according to an opinion poll.

Furthermore, more than 40% of those questioned believe that creationism or intelligent design (ID) should be taught in school science lessons.

The survey was conducted by Ipsos MORI for the BBC's Horizon series.

Its latest programme, A War on Science, looks into the attempt to introduce ID into science classes in the US.

Over 2,000 participants took part in the survey, and were asked what best described their view of the origin and development of life:

  • 22% chose creationism

  • 17% opted for intelligent design

  • 48% selected evolution theory

  • and the rest did not know.


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23rd-Jan-2006 02:07 pm - Boys flunk life 101
babetista
By Steve Israel, Times Herald-Record

The most profound open secret in our nation, one that will soon rip apart the fabric of our society, is this: Boys are in trouble. They are falling far behind girls in elementary school, in college, in life.

An 11th-grade boy now reads and writes at the level of an eighth-grade girl. Just three decades ago, there was no disparity.

Forty years ago, three-quarters of all college graduates were men. Now, less than half of graduates are male. If the spiral continues, and every statistical trend says it will, men will soon account for only one-third of all college graduates.

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17th-Jan-2006 06:39 pm(no subject)
Chinese nanny state takes root in US

China's emergence as an economic superpower has been well-documented.

Western business leaders are said to be gearing up for all the changes to come, but they are not the only ones keen to get a head start.

An increasing number of families in the United States is looking to employ Chinese nannies - not so much for their child-rearing abilities, but more for their language skills.

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2nd-Jan-2006 12:11 pm - Yale Anthropology Professor
sigh
Original Article:  http://www.nytimes.com/2005/12/28/nyregion/28anarchist.html

When Scholarship and Politics Collided at Yale

David Graeber pulled a green object shaped like a Champagne cork out of his pocket.

"Do you know what this is?" he asked recently. "It's a plastic bullet." The bullet, he said, was fired by the police in Quebec City during a protest against globalization in 2001, grazing his head.

Battles with the police are a fact of life for Dr. Graeber, an associate professor of anthropology at Yale and a self-proclaimed anarchist. It was his battle with Yale that surprised him.

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5th-Dec-2005 02:25 pm - Pop Goes the Science Song
pucker
By Randy Dotinga

The Archies certainly never thought they'd inspire a song about energy production in muscle cells.

But, when he feels like livening up his biology classes, University of Washington lecturer Greg Crowther bursts into song to the melody of "Sugar Sugar," the bubble-gum '60s tune. "Glucose, ah sugar sugar," he sings. "You are my favorite fuel from the bloodborne substrate pool / Glucose -- monosaccharide sugar -- you're sweeter than a woman's kiss / 'cause I need you for glycolysis."

Not everyone is enthralled by the singing professor, who has dozens of other science songs in his repertoire. "At the end of the quarter," Crowther said, "there's at least one student who says something to the effect of, 'Please don't sing.'"

But for the most part, according to Crowther, students don't seem to mind. And that's a good thing: Thanks to the internet, science songs are getting wider distribution -- it's pretty likely students will come across a melody during an 8:15 a.m. biology class. There's even a national organization devoted to singing scientists.

Read original article

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1st-Dec-2005 02:17 pm(no subject)
Lions
I was reading an article in a magazine at the doctor's today about a woman who had grown up in the exclusive brethren, and had now left, and how she was coping with life outside the group, it made for interesting reading. I couldn't find the article on the internet, but this is also rather interesting:

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2-1534692,00.html/
21st-Nov-2005 02:15 am - The New White Flight
babetista
In Silicon Valley, two high schools with outstanding academic reputations are losing white students as Asian students move in. Why?
By SUEIN HWANG, November 19, 2005; Page A1


CUPERTINO, Calif. -- By most measures, Monta Vista High here and Lynbrook High, in nearby San Jose, are among the nation's top public high schools. Both boast stellar test scores, an array of advanced-placement classes and a track record of sending graduates from the affluent suburbs of Silicon Valley to prestigious colleges.

But locally, they're also known for something else: white flight. Over the past 10 years, the proportion of white students at Lynbrook has fallen by nearly half, to 25% of the student body. At Monta Vista, white students make up less than one-third of the population, down from 45% -- this in a town that's half white. Some white Cupertino parents are instead sending their children to private schools or moving them to other, whiter public schools. More commonly, young white families in Silicon Valley say they are avoiding Cupertino altogether.

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14th-Nov-2005 11:31 am - Woman poet ‘slain for her verse’
babetista
SHE risked torture, imprisonment, perhaps even death to study literature and write poetry in secret under the Taliban. Last week, when she should have been celebrating the success of her first book, Nadia Anjuman, was beaten to death in Herat, apparently murdered by her husband.

The 25-year-old Afghan had garnered wide praise in literary circles for the book Gule Dudi — Dark Flower — and was at work on a second volume.

Friends say her family was furious, believing that the publication of poetry by a woman about love and beauty had brought shame on it.

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4th-Nov-2005 02:37 pm(no subject)
Pickwick
2004 University of Montana Graduate Survey
(results snipped as they apply to Anthropology department)
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x-posted to schmarty_hosen
2nd-Nov-2005 10:46 am(no subject)
Headscarf defeat riles French Muslims

Rioting in a Paris suburb has highlighted discontent among French youths of foreign origin, many of whom define themselves through Islam.

As part of a series on French Muslims, the BBC News website's Henri Astier reports on the impact of the headscarf ban.

Every morning headteacher Genevieve Piniau stands guard at the gate of the Lycee Robert Doisneau in Corbeil-Essonne near Paris.

She is there to ensure no rules are broken, including a ban on Muslim headscarves and other "conspicuous" religious symbols in French state schools. Dozens of girls duly take off their hijabs as they approach the gate.

But when one student tries to sneak past Ms Piniau with hers still on, the headteacher immediately spots her: "Off with it!"

Despite this rare incident, Ms Piniau says the ban is now widely accepted.

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[See the original article for pictures and figures. The BBC also has a section of quotes from French Muslim Voices, which you can access through this link or through the article.]
24th-Oct-2005 03:16 pm - Three-day non-stop English lesson
Happy Juice
An Indian has taught a marathon non-stop, no-sleep English grammar class for three days to 60 students in the city of Mumbai (Bombay).

Sanjay Kumar Sinha taught for 73 hours and 24 minutes in an attempt to get into the Guinness Book of Records for the longest lesson.

The current record is held by a Polish man, Elzbieta Malinowska, who taught for 66 hours in June 2004.

Mr Sinha features in Indian record books for the quickest lesson taught.

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